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Archive for the 'Masonic Symbolism' Category

Masonic Ring

Author: Ringmaster
21.02.2012

Masonic Ring, the all-telling sign of the Freemason. The Masonic Ring is the sign of Freemasons all over the world. Typically shown with the Compass and Square on the top of the Masonic Ring and the Plumb and Trowel on the sides of the shank of the Masonic Ring, the ring is normally worn on the third index finger next to the pinky finger on the right hand. There are several different opinions as to whether the points of the compass on the Masonic Ring should point toward or away from the wearer’s body. As of this date, the Grand Lodges have not made any rulings on this subject. Take one viewpoint for example. If you were to hang the American Flag, would you hang it with the stars at the bottom or top of the flag? Obviously you would fly the flag with the stars on top; therefore, the wearer of the Masonic Ring should wear the ring with the points of the compass and square pointing toward the wearer. Another viewpoint is that when the emblem of the Compass and square is displayed on a
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Masonic Ring

Author: Ringmaster
21.02.2012

Masonic Ring, the all-telling sign of the Freemason. The Masonic Ring is the  sign of Freemasons all over the world. Typically shown with the Compass and Square on the top of the Masonic Ring and the Plumb and Trowel on the sides of the shank of the Masonic Ring, the ring is normally worn on the third index finger next to the pinky finger on the right hand. There are several different opinions as to whether the points of the compass on the Masonic Ring should point toward or away from the wearer’s body. As of this date, the Grand Lodges have not made any rulings on this subject. Take one viewpoint for example. If you were to hang the American Flag, would you hang it with the stars at the bottom or top of the flag? Obviously you would fly the flag with the stars on top; therefore, the wearer of the Masonic Ring should wear the ring with the points of the compass and square pointing toward the wearer. Another viewpoint is that when the emblem of the Compass and square is displayed on a building or a pennant, the normal customer would be that the points of the compass would point downward. When displayed on the Altar, the points of the compass and square point away from the Master. As the Master from his station views the compass from the Altar of his lodge, the points are from, not towards him. As the wearer of a compass watch charm views it, the points are down and away from his eyes. In a similar way, as the Mason views the emblem on his Masonic Ring, the points should be down or away from his eyes. The square is the symbol of earthly things and the compass of heavenly perfection. As a combined emblem, the ends of the square point up as a symbol of man’s aspirations toward God; the points of the compass are down to represent heavenly qualities coming down from God to earth; therefore it would seem that the proper way to wear the Masonic Ring would be that is which its symbolism is best expressed; namely, that in which, when the hand is held in its usual position, the points of the compass of the Masonic Ring are towards the earth and away from the wearer’s eyes.

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07.02.2012
06.02.2012

The Significance of the Masonic Ring

Of the many traditions and ceremonies associated with Freemasonry, most of them use unique objects which are bestowed with symbolic meaning by the Brotherhood. Masonic rings are very symbolic objects and perhaps the most common outward sign that its bearer is of The Craft. While most are worn on the right hand, previously Masonic rings were worn in secret, hiding the wearer’s identity from the public to protect their associations from detection. Historically speaking, a Freemason could be executed if he allowed his identity to be revealed.There are several styles of Masonic rings, most of which carry a crest or image which incorporates the square and compass motif. The square and compass designates common knowledge which is shared by Freemasons and is regarded as an Oath towards living a life of virtue and righteousness.

20.01.2012

What is the proper way to wear a Masonic Ring? Should the points of the compass be toward or away from the body?

There are many opinions on this subject. To the best of my knowledge the Grand Lodges have not made any regulation on this subject.

“If you were hanging the American flag, would you put the stars down? The same holds true of the ring. It should look right side up to him. Rings are therefore worn with the points of the compass toward the wearer.”

Another opinion is that “When the emblem of the square and compasses is displayed on a building, pennant, button, watch charm etc., universal custom requires the points of the compass point downward. When displayed on the Altar they point away from the Master. As the Master from his station views the compass from the Altar of his lodge, the points are from, not towards him. As the wearer of a compass watch charm views it, the points are down and away from his eyes. In a similar way as he views the emblem on his ring the points should be down or away from his eyes.

The square is the symbol of earthly, the compass of heavenly perfection. As a combined emblem the ends of the square point up as a symbol of man’s aspirations toward God; the points of the compass are down to represent heavenly qualities coming down from God to earth. Therefore it would seem that the proper way to wear a ring would be that is which its symbolism is best expressed; namely, that in which, when the hand is held in its usual position the points of the compass are towards the earth and away from the wearer’s eyes.

09.01.2012

An implement of Operative Masonry, which has been adopted by Speculative Freemasons as the peculiar working-tool of the Master’s Degree. By this implement, and its use in Operative Masonry to spread the cement which binds all the parts of the building into one common mass, we are taught to spread the cement of affection and kindness, which unites all the members of the Masonic family, wheresoever dispersed over the globe, into one companionship of Brotherly Love and an old custom in an Oxford Lodge, England, gave it prominence as a jewel, and as a symbol it goes back to the practice of the Ancient.

Today this implement is considered the appropriate working-tool of a Master Mason, because, in Operative Masonry, while the Apprentice is engaged in preparing the rude materials, which require only the Gage and Gavel to give them their proper shape. the Fellow Craft places them in their proper position by means of the Plumb, Level, and Square; but the Master Mason alone, having examined their correctness and proved them true and trusty, secures them permanently in their place by spreading, with the trowel, the cement that irrevocably binds them
together. The Trowel has also been adopted as the jewel of the Select Master.
But its uses in this Degree are not symbolical. They are simply connected with
the historical legend of the Degree. An example of the trowel can be found on most of the Master Mason Rings

- Source: Mackey’s Encyclopedia of Freemasonry

The Masonic Apron

Author: Ringmaster
01.01.2012

 

Essentially the Masonic Apron is the badge of honorable  labor.   The right to wear it is given only the most honorable of tried and trusted men.   Much has been written on these meanings of the symbol. As the apron of all sorts, sizes and colors was an  article of sacred investure in many of these, so is it in ours.  What is  truly important is the apron itself; what is less important is its size and  shape, its method of wearing.  Material and color are symbolic, but a  Freemasons may be – and has been many – “properly clothed” with a handkerchief  tucked about his middle, and it is common practice to make presentation aprons,  most elaborately designed and embellished, without using leather at all, let  alone lambskin. An example of the Masonic Apron can be found at Fox Jewelry.

The Letter “G”

Author: Ringmaster
26.04.2009

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No individual can speak for Freemasonry, an individual may only express a personal view which may, or may not, be shared by other Freemasons.  In many countries the Letter ‘G’ is taken to mean God, the Supreme Being, and whilst it is an interpretation held by many Freemasons it is not a universal view. An example of this can be found on the Masonic Ring worn by a Master Mason.

Masonic Symbolism

Author: Ringmaster
26.04.2009

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At one time, when very few were could read, the use of symbolism was widespread. It was a form of visual shorthand. Symbols were easily recognized, and understood, but as literacy increased the need for symbolism declined. In centuries past, symbols, especially religious symbols, were common throughout Christendom. The Compass and Square, the symbol of the 3rd degree Master Mason is found on the Masonic Rings found at Fox Jewelry.